BLOG

Contributors: Luca Nicola and Paolo Rossi Castelli

In this blog you will find many articles dedicated to the most advanced frontiers of scientific research and the innovative therapies that are being tried out around the world. However, our idea of scientific dissemination does not stop at information – it also strives to embrace the dialogue between researchers and artists. Furthermore, we examine the philosophy of science with renewed interest and firmly believe that it is increasingly necessary to overcome the damaging barriers that exist between humanist and scientific culture.

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2019.06.17-dna-spazzatura

Are the mutations that trigger autism in junk DNA?

According to the Flatiron Institute’s Center for Computational Biology, the so-called junk DNA could play an important role in the onset of autism.

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RNA genetic code heart

Fragments of genetic code to repair the heart

The researchers demonstrated that the introduction of a small piece of genetic material to the heart stimulates the regeneration of the heart tissue.

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lectureintelligenzaartificiale047

Our mind is less and less in our head

Michele Di Francesco and Barbara Henry met to describe what can we expect from the unstoppable development of Artificial Intelligence.

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Electrical dressings effective against bacteria

“Electrical” dressings effective against bacteria

A weak electric current can accelerate the healing of wounds: there are several patches in the USA named wireless electroceutical dressing, or WED.

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Carol Dweck mindset

Changing your mental attitude will change your life

The mindset is the focus of the studies carried out by Carol Dweck, Professor of Psychology at Stanford University.

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amber ammonite mollusc

A marine mollusc from 99 million years ago found in amber

A 99-million years piece of amber was found in the north of Myanmar by researchers from the Chinese Academy of Sciences.

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2019.05.29-chorea-di-huntington

Huntington’s disease, the new “anti-sense” drug is working

There is increased hope for sufferers of Huntington disease, thanks to a new drug called HTTRx.

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2019.05.27-plastica

A 100% recyclable plastic (really) from California

Tomorrow’s plastic really could be 100% recyclable: a new type of plastic, when simply dipped into an acidic solution at room temperature, decomposes until it “returns” to its basic elements.

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2019.05.22-rice-university

Artificial blood vessels for future transplants

Using a specific 3D printer and a special biogel, a group of bioengineers managed to construct the equivalent of a vascular network.

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Microbiota transplant

Microbiota transplant reduces the symptoms of autism

Fecal microbiota transplant (or FMT, in short) is achieving significant results in a very different field: autism spectrum disorders (ASD).

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2019.05.17-lableonardo

Museums, a natural meeting place for Art and Science

Museums act as true and proper hubs of knowledge, encouraging dialogue between cultures and inviting visitors to co-create, share and interact.

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Barbara Mazzolai

Welcome to the age of plantoids

We may not be far from the mass and everyday use of robots. Soon robots will be living in our houses, they will help us with our domestic chores, in helping the elderly, and will be useful for monitoring the...

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2019.05.08-ebola-virus

New strain of Ebola found in bats in Kenya

A sixth strain Ebola, the dangerous virus that cyclically appears in several areas of Africa, was isolated in the saliva and feces of bats.

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plasma reactor

“Non-thermal plasma” kills airborne viruses

Ninety-nine percent of airborne viruses can be eliminated if they are exposed to a bombardment of ions and highly-reactive molecule fragments.

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JAMES BEACHAM CERN

The importance of spreading scientific knowledge

An abstract of the speech held by James Beacham during the prize-giving ceremony of the IBSA Fellowships 2018.

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cystic fibrosis

Can an anti-fungal drug be effective in treating cystic fibrosis?

An old drug, amphotericin B, used for decades against fungal infections, could also be useful for treating cystic fibrosis.

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brain Schizophrenia

Schizophrenia already starts in the womb

Researchers from the US have managed to identify more than 400 genes, the variants of which are associated with schizophrenia.

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2019.04.08-radioactive

New laser for “detecting” radioactive objects

Thanks to an innovative technique developed in the USA, it will be easier to detect radioactivity in wide and crowded areas.

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2019.04.05-diattenuation-imaging-di-provides-structural-information-about-brain-tissue

How we can “see” the hidden parts of the brain

Discovering the composition of the indecipherable areas of the brain could soon be possible, thanks to diattenuation imaging.

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ted-conference-vallortigara

What is the advantage of being left-handed?

The neuroscientist Giorgio Vallortigara talks about how the human race has a majority that prefers to use their right hand, whereas a small minority of people are left-handed.

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2019.04.01-fibromialgia

A test for the “mysterious” fibromyalgia from the USA

Thanks to a study published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry by researchers from Ohio, Fibromyalgia diagnosis could become easier.

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Kriti Sharma

Are we risking transmitting our biases to Artificial Intelligence?

The technologist Kriti Sharma raises a very serious issue: are we risking transmitting our biases to Artificial Intelligence?

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2019.03.22-narcolessia

Confirmed once again: narcolepsy has an autoimmune origin

Recent studies published in the scientific journal Nature have confirmed that narcolepsy has an autoimmune origin.

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perfectionism

The risks of perfectionism

Thomas Curran is a social psychologist who has been studying the effects of perfectionism in American, Canadian and British students for years.

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3D printer

3D printer that “extends” new skin over burns

An innovative prototype of 3D printer promises to replace strips of skin (due to various kinds of trauma or illnesses) without any size restrictions and without the need for skin grafts.

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Hito Steyerl

The learning processes of Artificial Intelligence become art

How Artificial Intelligence can influence the urban environment and the production of art in public spaces? Reflections from Hito Steyerl.

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insomnia genetics

956 DNA variants behind the risk of insomnia

For the first time a complete “genetic map” of insomnia (a problem suffered chronically by 770 million people worldwide) has been drawn up by an international team of neurophysiologists.

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2019.03.11-terapia_cellulare_crohn

“Modified” cells to treat Crohn’s disease

Cell therapy, which is already being used in experiments against several forms of tumors, could also be used in the near future to treat Crohn’s disease.

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2019.03.08-gdnf-delivery-device-credits-mintmotion-for-passionate-productions-

Fighting Parkinson’s by injecting a protein into the brain

A new pioneering study has given hope to people suffering from Parkinson’s disease and from illnesses in which nerve cells die or do not work as they should.

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2019.03.06-microbiota_e_depressione

Can intestinal bacteria trigger depression?

What does intestinal microbiota have to do with depression? A lot, according to a report published in the scientific journal Nature Microbiology by a team from the Catholic University of Lovanio, in Belgium.

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bacteria antibiotics

Possible antibiotics for humans from insect bacteria

The antibiotics of tomorrow may also come from an unexpected source: insects or, to be more precise, from the bacteria that infect insects, or that live in symbiosis with them.

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theo_jansen_dream-beastspaolo_soave-museonazionalescienzatecnologia_0026

The kinetic marvels of Theo Jansen

“Without imagination we wouldn’t be alive: the task of an artist is to stimulate peoples’ imagination”. Theo Jansen inaugurated the “Dream Beasts” exhibition in Milan with this sentence which encompasses its entire poetic vision.

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pufferfish pill

Pill inspired by the pufferfish to monitor the stomach

Researchers from the MIT of Boston have been inspired by the biological mechanisms of the pufferfish to create a certain type of pill for diagnostic and curative purposes.

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female brain

Women? They have brains that are three years’ younger

The female brain ages slower than the male brain of the same age by approximately three years.

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Artificial intelligence

The robot-plant that climbs like a tendril

The first flexible robot, capable of imitating the behaviour of tendrils and coiling around a support, has been created by researchers from the Center of Micro-BioRobotics of the IIT-Italian Institute of Technology.

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artificial intelligence AI

Brain activity? A work of art interpreted by Artificial Intelligence

The neuroscientist Yukiyasu Kamitani and the French artist Pierre Huyghe used a kind of artificial intelligence software capable of “reading” and visually decoding our brain waves to build representations of human thought.

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circadian rhythms tumor tumour

New strategy: blocking cancer’s “clock

A new area of study could offer unprecedented solutions in the fight against cancer, namely that of attempting to unhinge the circadian rhythms of diseased cells.

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austronauts immunology

Missions to Mars? The immune system goes haywire

There is an obstacle that will make missions from Earth to Mars particularly difficult and risky for astronauts: the effects of the lack of gravity and cosmic radiation on the immune system.

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2019.02.01-lievito

Surprise: junk DNA sometimes helps cells

Recently a growing number of studies has shown that the portion of DNA that appears to have no precise functions, can also perform very important tasks.

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2019.01.30-makoto_scott

The lifecycle of nature in 4 minutes

How can you explain the lifecycle of flowers to a three-year old girl and make her understand that the cycle is continuous and never-ending?

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THE AUTHORS

Paolo Rossi Castelli
Journalist since 1983, has been dealing with scientific divulgation for years, especially in the fields of medicine and biology. Creator of Sportello Cancro, the site created by corriere.it on oncology, in collaboration with the Umberto Veronesi Foundation. He collaborated with the pages of the Science of Corriere della Sera for several years. He is currently President of the Lugano Science Foundation.