This section explores to the most advanced frontiers of science and informs about the innovative research that is being tried out around the world. It also proposes the dialogue between researchers and artists, to overcome the boundaries that still separate humanist culture and scientific culture.

contributors: Luca Nicola and Paolo Rossi Castelli
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A new protein offers new hope in the treatment of type 2 diabetes

There may be a new strategy in the future for treating type 2 diabetes from researchers of Cornell University in New York and Harvard Medical School in Boston

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Nature’s precious imperfections

The science philosopher and evolutionist Telmo Pievani with his latest book he hypothesized a theory of imperfection.

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Parkinson’s? It starts in the brain, but also in the intestine

Parkinson’s disease could be much more complex than what has been believed up till now and, in particular, various sub-types of the disease could exist.

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Climate issues: how to choose the words (and the images) to talk about it

The British newspaper “The Guardian” has redefined the vocabulary that is to be used by its journalists and editors when writing about climate matters.

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dalla-materia-oscura-del-dna-una-spinta-ai-tumori

Cancer-driving mutation in the “dark matter” of DNA

The genetic code does not carry out its main function: to code and “produce” proteins. This is why it has been called the dark matter of DNA.

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Artificial Intelligence: how is it intelligent?

Will machines end up replacing us? Or will they develop and bring out the true potential of humans? These are open questions, the answers to which are yet to be written.

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Depressione DBS

Tiny electrodes in the brain to fight depression

The most severe forms of depression could be cured in the future with deep brain stimulation.

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Cells repairing damaged tissue post-heart attack in the fluid surrounding the heart

A group of researchers from Calgary University have published a study that could have major repercussions on post-heart attack therapies.

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Narrative medicine: listening to patients’ stories

“Narrative Medicine. Honoring the Stories of Illness” it's a wonderful book by Rita Charon that recently has been translated into Italian.

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Giornata digitale Lugano

Artificial Intelligence enhances and strengthens our human existence

On the 2019 Digital Day, Francesco Morace discussed the relationship between ethics and digital, and new perspectives of AI.

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2019.09.23-batteri-mangiaplastica

Bacteria that eat plastic help to combat the problems of pollution

Recycling and reusing plastic has always been fundamental, but this only covers a tiny part of the plastic we produce.

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genesi e storia dell'Universo guido tonelli

What we know about the origin of the Universe

“Genesis” by Guido Tonelli is a fascinating scientific story that traces the history of the universe in seven chapters.

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Nel mondo circa 100 milioni di persone vengono infettate ogni anno dal batterio Chlamydia trachomatis, che colpisce in prevalenza le donne.

Sexually-transmitted infections – the first vaccine against chlamydia

Every year around 100 million people worldwide are infected with Chlamydia trachomatis, a sexually-transmitted infection that mainly affects women.

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l'anoressia è un disturbo psichico e del metabolismo

Anorexia nervosa is not just a mental disorder

Anorexia nervosa has a more complex origin than previously thought: its causes are to be linked to a series of metabolic abnormalities.

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leadership and inspiration

Exploring the golden circle

Every single person knows what they do. Some know how they do it. But very, very few people or organizations know why they do what they do.

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Music may provide an unexpected help in the deciphering of proteins

Using music to help to “decipher” proteins

Accordig to a study published in the scientific journal ACS Nano, music may provide an unexpected help in the “deciphering” of proteins.

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bacteria genetic

Modified bacteria become anti-cancer drugs

Promising new avenues are being explored in the field of cancer research, thanks to the genetic reprogramming of living cells like bacteria.

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2019.07.24-daniel-kahneman

What do we mean when we talk about happiness?

Daniel Kahneman's research, an Israeli psychologist, is focused on how our errors of judgment depend on preconceptions or wrong perceptions.

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space

The “indestructible” mold of the space station

Mold is incredibly robust, to the point that several species found on spacecraft, survive high level of X-ray exposure.

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HIV eliminated from infected animals for the first time

For the first time the HIV virus, responsible for AIDS, has been completely eliminated from animals that had contracted this disease.

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A touching lesson of humanity from a great scientist

The talk given by Daniela Lucangeli is a testimony of a scientist that passionately investigates the relationship between brain and soul.

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batteri bacteria

Better athletic performance thanks to certain bacteria

Behind the success of marathon runners there is also perhaps an unexpected element: particular types of bacteria in the intestine.

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Electronic tattoo for heart monitoring

Bioengineers from the University of Texas have created a device that could considerably facilitate the monitoring of heart patients.

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Stefano Mancuso

The fascinating secret life of plants

The neurobiologist Stefano Mancuso, has been working for years to change our vision of plants, dispelling clichés that have been handed down for millennia.

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2019.06.28-glucose-textile-edwin-jager-201920190612-104005

Energy from sugar and oxygen for artificial muscles

Bioengineers from Sweden have managed to produce artificial muscle tissue that uses oxygen and glucose to extract the energy to contract the fibers and create movement.

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forumibsa_usilugano_21giu2019_55

Therapies for cancer, new lines of research

Three true giants in cancer research met at the IBSA Foundation Forum "Revolutionary therapies for cancer", which was held in Lugano.

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harvard unversity

Mini-brains created in the lab to study new cures

For the first time scientists have managed to grow fragments of human brain tissue in the lab, to be used for studying several types of diseases and related therapies.

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2019.06.17-dna-spazzatura

Are the mutations that trigger autism in junk DNA?

According to the Flatiron Institute’s Center for Computational Biology, the so-called junk DNA could play an important role in the onset of autism.

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Fragments of genetic code to repair the heart

The researchers demonstrated that the introduction of a small piece of genetic material to the heart stimulates the regeneration of the heart tissue.

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Our mind is less and less in our head

Michele Di Francesco and Barbara Henry met to describe what can we expect from the unstoppable development of Artificial Intelligence.

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Electrical dressings effective against bacteria

“Electrical” dressings effective against bacteria

A weak electric current can accelerate the healing of wounds: there are several patches in the USA named wireless electroceutical dressing, or WED.

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Carol Dweck mindset

Changing your mental attitude will change your life

The mindset is the focus of the studies carried out by Carol Dweck, Professor of Psychology at Stanford University.

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A marine mollusc from 99 million years ago found in amber

A 99-million years piece of amber was found in the north of Myanmar by researchers from the Chinese Academy of Sciences.

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2019.05.29-chorea-di-huntington

Huntington’s disease, the new “anti-sense” drug is working

There is increased hope for sufferers of Huntington disease, thanks to a new drug called HTTRx.

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2019.05.27-plastica

A 100% recyclable plastic (really) from California

Tomorrow’s plastic really could be 100% recyclable: a new type of plastic, when simply dipped into an acidic solution at room temperature, decomposes until it “returns” to its basic elements.

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2019.05.22-rice-university

Artificial blood vessels for future transplants

Using a specific 3D printer and a special biogel, a group of bioengineers managed to construct the equivalent of a vascular network.

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Microbiota transplant

Microbiota transplant reduces the symptoms of autism

Fecal microbiota transplant (or FMT, in short) is achieving significant results in a very different field: autism spectrum disorders (ASD).

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2019.05.17-lableonardo

Museums, a natural meeting place for Art and Science

Museums act as true and proper hubs of knowledge, encouraging dialogue between cultures and inviting visitors to co-create, share and interact.

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Barbara Mazzolai

Welcome to the age of plantoids

We may not be far from the mass and everyday use of robots. Soon robots will be living in our houses, they will help us with our domestic chores, in helping the elderly, and will be useful for monitoring the...

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2019.05.08-ebola-virus

New strain of Ebola found in bats in Kenya

A sixth strain Ebola, the dangerous virus that cyclically appears in several areas of Africa, was isolated in the saliva and feces of bats.

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“Non-thermal plasma” kills airborne viruses

Ninety-nine percent of airborne viruses can be eliminated if they are exposed to a bombardment of ions and highly-reactive molecule fragments.

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JAMES BEACHAM CERN

The importance of spreading scientific knowledge

An abstract of the speech held by James Beacham during the prize-giving ceremony of the IBSA Fellowships 2018.

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cystic fibrosis

Can an anti-fungal drug be effective in treating cystic fibrosis?

An old drug, amphotericin B, used for decades against fungal infections, could also be useful for treating cystic fibrosis.

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brain Schizophrenia

Schizophrenia already starts in the womb

Researchers from the US have managed to identify more than 400 genes, the variants of which are associated with schizophrenia.

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2019.04.08-radioactive

New laser for “detecting” radioactive objects

Thanks to an innovative technique developed in the USA, it will be easier to detect radioactivity in wide and crowded areas.

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2019.04.05-diattenuation-imaging-di-provides-structural-information-about-brain-tissue

How we can “see” the hidden parts of the brain

Discovering the composition of the indecipherable areas of the brain could soon be possible, thanks to diattenuation imaging.

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ted-conference-vallortigara

What is the advantage of being left-handed?

The neuroscientist Giorgio Vallortigara talks about how the human race has a majority that prefers to use their right hand, whereas a small minority of people are left-handed.

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2019.04.01-fibromialgia

A test for the “mysterious” fibromyalgia from the USA

Thanks to a study published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry by researchers from Ohio, Fibromyalgia diagnosis could become easier.

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Kriti Sharma

Are we risking transmitting our biases to Artificial Intelligence?

The technologist Kriti Sharma raises a very serious issue: are we risking transmitting our biases to Artificial Intelligence?

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2019.03.22-narcolessia

Confirmed once again: narcolepsy has an autoimmune origin

Recent studies published in the scientific journal Nature have confirmed that narcolepsy has an autoimmune origin.

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CONTRIBUTORS

Paolo Rossi Castelli
Journalist since 1983, has been dealing with scientific divulgation for years, especially in the fields of medicine and biology. Creator of Sportello Cancro, the site created by corriere.it on oncology, in collaboration with the Umberto Veronesi Foundation. He collaborated with the pages of the Science of Corriere della Sera for several years. He is currently President of the Lugano Science Foundation.